Probe board game rules

Battle Cry!

Our first attempt at playing this game - we set up the board wrong.As is self-evident from the name of the game is a strategy war game. It recreates the American Civil War. Players play as the Union or the Confederates, in other words, North or South America and can play through each of 30 scenarios from the war. The board is set up using Terrain Tiles with different images on them to create different parts of the country. Each scenario is defined in the Rule Book and has a pictorial representation of the starting layout of the board. My favourite thing about these descriptions is that there’s a little historical information provided about each scenario, but at the bottom, right after it tells you who originally won that battle it says: “The stage is set, the battle lines are drawn, and you are in command. The rest is history.” And it leaves you to find out who the best strategist is!

Dave and I did initially play the game slightly wrong, because we were in a rush. But this just reinforces our firm belief that you should thoroughly read the rules before starting any game.

The stuff. I know the layout of the box looks weird, I have since changed it, but taking another photo was a lot of effort...

What’s In The Box:

  1. 8 Battle Dice
  2. 9 Double-sided Entrenchment/Fieldwork Tokens
  3. 46 Double-sided Terrain Tiles
  4. 14 Double-sided Flag Tokens
  5. 60 Command Cards
  6. 3 Artillery with Flags and 6 Artillery Crewmembers
  7. 3 Generals with Flags, 3 Cavalry with Flags and 6 Cavalry
  8. 10 Infantry with Flags and 30 Infantry

Plus also (and in a different picture just for fun):

The Game Board, Terrain Reference Sheet and Game Rule Book.

The starting set up for the simplest scenario, called First Bull Run. Blue is Union, Grey is Confederate.Objective: To capture a given number of your opponents flags before they do yours and win the match!

Although this game has a few scenarios that’re a little time-consuming to set up, it’s actually not all that complicated. Turns consist of five parts: playing a Command Card, giving orders, moving, battling and drawing a new card. I’ve only played two of the available scenarios so far, but both have been really good. The starting set up for the board on the simplest set up is this:

To give you an idea of how simple this set-up is comparatively, here’s a photo of the next one on in the Rule Book:

There’re a fair few men on the board here, but it’s a lot simpler than it appears – the occupants of one hex on the board are a unit and all move together. Infantry can only move 1 hex at a time, Cavalry moves 3 hexes, Artillery moves 1 hex, and a General can move 3 by itself or if it’s in a unit with Cavalry, but can only move one when in a unit with Infantry.

Command Cards:

There are two different kinds of Command Cards; the Section Cards and the Tactic Cards and Dave and I have ranked the Section Cards in terms of usefulness. The least useful are the Scout cards, these allow you to order one of your units in one section of the board, then draw two cards instead of one, and choose which one to keep, discarding the other. Next are Probe cards, you can now give two orders to two of your units in one section of the board. Yet more useful is Attack, you guessed it already, you can now give three orders to three units in one section of the board. But the most useful of these cards are the Assault cards, these allow you to give one order per card you have including the one you’re playing, to units in one section of the board. The section of the board you give orders in is always specified on these cards and can be either Centre, Left Flank, or Right Flank.

A Section Command Card in play. Picture lovingly borrowed from http://www.sonofthesouth.net/uncle-sam/uncle-sam-posters.htm An example of a Tactic Command Card in play. Of the three Battle Dice rolled here two were hits. As you can see, the small image on the dice is of a Cavalry figure. When rolling to eliminate opponents you must roll the correct symbols.

Parker Brothers Probe; Parker Brothers Game of Words (1964 Edition)
Toy (Parker Brothers)
  • Most Provocative game of words
  • A true party game that students and adults play together and thoroughly enjoy
  • Two, Three or four may play with a single set; two sets may be combined for use by eight players
  • For ages 8 years and over; a great way to build one s vocabulary
  • Made in the U.S.A.

That Cat Look Mighty Hungry To Me

by mBlaine

So I listened to Ray's show again on Thursday. – By the way, the other show to listen to on KGO is Len Tillum on the weekends. ('I'm a lawya.') I gotta ask that guy for a job one of these days. – But yeah, Ray's show on Thursday wasn't as intense as the night before. There were some good callers. Especially those two women right in a row – the old Brooklyn gal running down the articles in the Nation. She just rocked. Then immediately after her, that woman who was steaming about the effects of the Silicon Valley stock crash reverberating around the world. – At first I couldn't make out what she was saying. It sounded like she was trying to justify the system against some kind of criticism. Because she was talking about foreign loan defaults and old peoples' pension funds...

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