Board game rules sequence

Sequence + Skill = Crossways « One Gamer's Opinion

“Oh! It’s like Sequence, ” was my first thought when I saw this chip placing, card laying game. And while that wasn’t far from true, Cross Ways offered some interesting twists on this familiar game.

If you are not familiar with Sequence, allow me to explain: In Sequence you play a card and place a chip on a corresponding spot on the board, the game is won by getting four chips in a row of your color. Each card is represented on the board twice, so you always have some small choice in the game about where you place. Otherwise, the game is largely about luck of the draw, and if you like that kind of thing, more power to you. However, I for one have always found there to be far more interesting ways to fill my time.

So how is Crossways different? For starters, it is a bit more strategic. You see, the places on the board are not marked as “King of Spades” or “Eight of Hearts”, instead the board is covered in much simpler spaces such as “Black King” and “Red Eight”, so you could place the King of Spades, or the King of Clubs, on that space. The goal of the game has also changed. You are not trying to simply get four in a row, but get a line of pieces that span the board. This allows you to zig-zag around the board, taking the path that will suit your cards best.

One common strategy in Sequence (when your hand allowed you to have such luxury as a strategy) was to place your chip on a spot that would be desirable to your opponent, thereby cutting them off. However, in Crossways each spot on the board may be occupied by more than one piece; in fact, the pieces are designed to stack. This is cool and interesting, but what makes it neater is an added rule: two chips of the same color which have been stacked on top of each other, blocks that place from being played on by anyone else. This leaves the player pondering if it is worth it to play twice on the same spot, or save that card and play elsewhere.

When I drew a pair while playing Sequence, I would curse my bad luck. The cards were always on opposite sides of the board, and were almost never helpful. However, in Crossways, drawing pairs is a very good thing, because pairs act as a wild card. You get to place two chips anywhere on the board you like. This could be on the same spot (and therefore blocking it), or it could be on two different spots, your choice. Being able to play on any two spots throughout the game is a huge advantage that takes away the need for a “lucky draw”. Sure, you have to be lucky enough to draw a pair into your hand, but that is a relatively minor problem compared with needing to draw one specific card out of a deck of 104.

Review of
'Crossways'

Mechanics: ★★★★
Instructions: ★★★★
Replay-ability: ★★★★
Price ($24.99): ★★★★
Components: ★★★★
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Overall Rating: ★★★★


Best board games for a date?

by ---

Can anybody suggest a good, fun boardgame to play on a night in with a guy you've been dating a month and a half or so? He says he's always wanted to just hang out on a week night and play a board game but none of his girlfriends have ever been into it. I happen to LOVE board games, but my favorites are ones he doesn't like (Monopoly, Risk, etc.) I admit I haven't been board game shopping in a while, can anyone suggest something cool with rules that aren't too complicated?

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